Barefoot & Preaching is a syndicated monthly column in The Catholic Register.

When the light shifts: sitting here alone with you…

When the light shifts: sitting here alone with you…

Photo Credit: Darryl Millette

For more than eight hundred days, the earth has been spinning its way around the sun, shining in spite of Abbie’s death, but I struggle to see it. The sun and moon come and go. I fight to feel anything other than the sting of injustice at a world without her. Somewhere over the summer, the light in my world shifts. My eyes stop being blinded by darkness and start seeing the stars again.  

I am convinced there is no moving on from the wounds that break our hearts; there are only shifts. The wounds wind themselves into our stories, bound up with grasping or grace. I took a deep dive into healing this spring and summer and let the Creator of the stars shine light into the darkest parts of my heart.

Having tried to fix myself and failed, I lent myself to hope instead. I showed up for counselling, took time to rest, did a lot of journaling. While I watched, I could see light and shadows. I felt emotions without understanding them. I waited.

And when we settled back into life this fall, the universe had shifted somehow. I felt lighter and brighter and it took me awhile to realize it. The light had shifted without my realizing it in the moment. I sat with my journal and traced God’s touches – and Abbie’s. Three moments weaved a constellation I hadn’t seen before.

Under the brightest, bluest prairie sky in July, I sang Ave Maria over the grave of a cousin we lost way too soon. And my heart was broken and being held together at the same time. Abbie was holding him and I was singing to his family, and somehow God was blowing in the wind.

Standing on a dock at dusk in August, I held a crying boy tight in my arms. He was shaking with grief at the loss of a parent and a friend, and we breathed deep into the light of a huge moon, so close we might have reached up to touch it. He sobbed that he should be getting over it, but the harder he tried, the more it hurt. “It’s a lie that you could get over it,” I said, looking straight into his eyes and my own heart. “You get changed by it. Someday it will hurt differently, but only if we feel this pain now.”

I returned to work after vacation and discovered that the PTSD had retreated. I woke in the morning feeling rested. I sat at my desk and breathed deep without feeling fear. I looked at the September to do list without crippling overwhelm. The details that have haunted me are taking their place as just small parts in the story of her life. I am finding comfort in feeling Abbie close.

For the first time in two and a half years, I feel like I am more whole than broken.

What kind of miracle is it that the same world that broke us could also heal? How is it that living through pain can transform it? Why does the most extreme darkness reveal the most marvelous purple light? There are still lots of hard days ahead, and I am slowly giving myself over more fully to the God who works these shifts.

The empty chair beside me once threatened to pull my heart from my chest; now it is a reminder that you are sitting right beside me. The sad, silent spaces you used to fill with sarcasm are becoming invitations for me to say the things you always teased me for holding back. Birthday candles burn for us this week, and instead of feeling completely lost without you, I feel you cheering me on to life.

The light shifts, and I can see your presence more clearly than your absence. Every dime you leave in the washing machine, every purple sky, every chocolate wrapper that finds its way to the floor of my pantry. Missing you still hurts, but now it also reminds me joyfully that you lived, and still live. From beyond the heavens, you are still changing me, still loving me, still here. Happy birthday in heaven, Duck. I hope the stars are spectacular.

The problem of unimaginable tragedy…

The problem of unimaginable tragedy…

The news in Saskatchewan has been full of heartache for the last week. First, the victim impact statements for the Humboldt bus crash brought wave after wave of loss. Then, Tammy Brown was found murdered in her home in Saskatoon. Late Friday evening, the Redwood trial...

Taking what I need when words fail…

Taking what I need when words fail…

I love words.  They flow constantly from my head to my heart, spill out of my mouth with laughter, make sense of my world.  And sometimes, words fail.  They take the air from my lungs or hit me in the face.  Sometimes, there isn’t sense to be made. We have more access...

On Being Barefoot…

Before the burning bush, God asks Moses to take off his sandals, to notice and reverence that he walks on holy land. This holy land continues to burn before me, before us, signaling God’s presence before we arrived rather than because we did. This life we are living was holy before we existed in it. This land and creation we call home is the first book of revelation, God’s love letter to us, bearing witness to the Creator of it all.Our lives and the moments that make them up are the stuff of sainthood, our invitations to participate in Divine life to be swallowed up and fulfilled by God. At the grocery store, in the false solitude of our cars and commutes, in our laundry rooms, and over text messages. My shoes run the risk of “protecting” me from the sacredness of this naked moment. And how I love shoes, and how my sensitive toes resist the prickles of grass and the mess of sand. But barefoot is how my spirituality works, daring to live an embodied and earthy love of Jesus who took on flesh. I’m wandering through this life, yearning to let go of my shoes, to walk reverently and with deep attention to what passes under my feet and to what isn’t yet my path. Barefoot is how I write, how I speak, how I work. Experience shored up against an insatiable thirst for knowledge; direct honesty honed by sensitivity; and vulnerability chained to a commitment to competency. And an unapologetically barefoot tendency to speak it as I feel it, which leads me to…

…and Preaching

I’m a preacher without a pulpit, with words that burn until they are spoken ~ aloud or on a page.

My ministry is one of colliding words and ideas, reaching out to find a connection with God’s amazing people.

The world seems to me to be spilling over with grace and we seem to be people who, all too quickly forget that all of this is pure gift.

When I’m driving, eating, visiting, resting, cleaning, working, playing, and almost everything else, I’m frequently stunned by the pure miracle of what simply is.

It’s not all promised joy and ease, but it is all presenced and remembered by the One who gives it. And I can’t stop talking about it, proclaiming it, preaching this good news that we have not been forgotten or forsaken in any moment of this life.

For reasons I don’t quite understand, my words seem to be given to encourage and inspire. In a world where women and girls are still too-often silenced or secondary, I’m barefoot and preaching because my soul won’t rest any other way. If my words can be a gift to you, then that is a gift for me.

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