So far, I have birthed three children and two books. The metaphor exists for me because both babies and books take up an intimate home inside my body for long months, growing and having a life in me which is externally visible but not shared by those on the outside of my body until after the labour and delivery. The difference between books and babies, however, is that the babies then make a home with me, where the books are sent out to make a home away from me. Here, I can only describe what they have meant for me as I sent them out, and trust that they have a life of their own wherever they end up.

My Heart of Flesh

By Leah Perrault (Novalis, 2018)

How do we live when suffering threatens to overwhelm us? Where do we find strength, comfort and courage when life feels out of control? In this book, Leah shares her heartbreakingly honest story of recovering from depression, miscarriage and the murder of a beloved sister – amid the regular “messes” of work, marriage and parenting.  Through opening her heart, and receiving support from the community and delving into her faith, she finds her way from despair and grief to a place of hope and quiet rejoicing in God’s gifts.

This book is about what happens when life feels like death, when comfort escapes us, when the flames have destroyed what we have loved and left us with ashes.  It is a book about how messiness is a place we are invited to really live.

Purchase My Heart of Flesh from Novalis.  If you’d like to get a signed copy, contact Leah.

 

Theology of the Body for Every Body

Theology of the Body for Every Body

By Leah Perrault (Novalis, 2012)

The book is short, full of stories, and it is my breathless effort to insist that our lives and bodies are holy.  It is my soap-box claiming of Theology of the Body (by Pope Saint John Paul II) as a celebration of the spiritual relevance of the human body in spiritual life, rather than primarily being a defense of a particular set of sexual norms.  It’s a great read for those wanting to go somewhere off the beaten path with Theology of the Body, and it’s also more than relevant for those who’ve never encountered the original text or its many other interpreters.

Purchase “Theology of the Body for Every Body".

How Far Can We Go? A Catholic Guide to Sex and Dating.

How Far Can We Go? A Catholic Guide to Sex and Dating.

By Leah Perrault & Brett Salkeld (Novalis, 2009)

Having been invited to talk about sex and dating with a group of teens, Brett and I tackled the most asked question among Christian teens: “How far can we go?”  Our book, built on the original answer in the first (of many) presentations, proposes a relational and progressive way for couples of all ages to discern and navigate physical intimacy in relationships.  It’s written for a late teen audience, and it reads well for young adults and for parents, pastors and teachers seeking to guide them.  It’s not an answer to the question so much as a guide to how to answer it for yourself, with faith and trust in the God who made you and calls you to love.

Purchase “How Far Can We Go? A Catholic Guide to Sex and Dating”.

Contact LEAH or BRETT.